15 Inspiring Lessons From Medium Posts

I’ve been a big Medium fan for the past couple of months now. Everyday I find a new post on in that is a great lesson in professional or personal development; something that I hold very important. I found that there are so many different stories that are actually valuable. What makes Medium so great is that these stories are all in one place.

Below I’ve selected 15 of the more awesome lessons I’d love for you to check out. Like I’ve said, they can be applied to your personal and professional lives. I think they are great advice for both newcomers and veterans.

How To Learn To Learn

by Ketan Anjaria

If you are having trouble when it comes to learning new things – whatever they may be. Ketan has a nice metaphor that explains how you could tackle new things. He explains that you should look at things the way a toddler does – one step at a time. They may seem like irrelevant or silly, but taking small steps, one at a time will event eventually get you where you want to go.

Who cares about design

by Jure Žove

Jure takes on a new perspective when it comes to design and asks a very harsh but important question of “Should designers even bother making beautiful products, websites, apps, packaging”? His point is that there are so many things that are badly designed in function and appeal that are sufficient for the consumers, then what is the point of designing something good?

3 Easy Ways To Win At Social Sharing

by Oliver Woods

Adding social sharing widgets to your pages to makes sharing frictionless for your users. Make sure to also add meta data to your pages so that the links produced by people using the widgets are complete with a nice title, thumbnail, and description — which encourages others to click through to your content.

Show Up.

by Paul Jarvis

I found this post very true to my heart – its summary can be made in one sentence: if you want to make something of yourself, get to work. It’s not a matter of creating the most amazing things at a first take, it’s a matter of putting in the time and working hard. That, right there, is a secret to success, as no one becomes a great designer – musician, actor, poet… – over night, it takes practice and effort.

Going it alone as a designer

by Guy Moorhouse

The best way to grow, the best way to get better is learning form others. The only way you can learn form others is if they show you something you do not already know; therefore, surround yourself with all kind of people as you will never know what they could teach you. It could be as obvious as literally surrounding yourself with smarter people, people with more experience but it doesn’t have to be.

Use Fewer Buttons

by Len Kendall

Len’s approach towards online content sharing could easily be applied to so many different aspects of design or even life. The big take away is that you should not ever spread yourself thing – focus on one path, one audience, one social media and you’ll me much more successful.

Your Product Sucks — Here’s Why

by Dan Ritzenthaler

Just because you launched a product – whatever it may be – doesn’t mean it’s done just because it’s shipped. Products need to be maintained besides fixing obvious bugs or complaints. People’s needs and preferences change, which is why you should never forget about your product once it’s shipped – ever; otherwise, your product will becomes mediocre very quickly.

Branding your brand is like trimming your beard

by Remy van der Geer

Remy has a very interesting metaphor for branding – it’s like having a bread. Does it suit you? Does it provide you with an image that is accurate for you? Does it convey who you are? I think his different perspective speaks to so many different people not only because it’s funny because it is actually accurate.

Writing Notifications That Don’t Suck

by Dave Feldman

Dave goes on a bit of a rant but a very good one; he’s annoyed by bad user experiences he has encountered on his phone. Overall his point is that you should not ever create things that are unnecessary, that are obvious. He provides great examples too! “Why notify me of something I already believe to be true?”

Design: Seeing Without Thinking

by Jon Myers

Jon’s post is another extension of Steve Krug’s book “Don’t make me think”. They both agree that users should never have to pay attention to what they are doing, they should never have to think, they should never be interrupted. The best interfaces are easy to use and don’t interfere with the user’s goal.

Join a startup to accelerate your life

by Shirsendu Karmakar

It is a different world working at a start up versus typical corporation. They are filled with so many different and unique people as well as ideas. The life style that comes with a job at a start up is incredibly different too. According to Shirsendu it is a much better choice.

Creative People Say No

by Kevin Ashton

It’s a cure to some that they have so much going on still they cannot say no; but you have to. Taking on crappy work or too much work is only going to hurt you professionally, creatively and personally as you will be stressed and you will end up producing weaker quality work; just say no.

Design for Collaborative Consumption

by Artefact

It’s interesting to see how many things are designed for only a solo user experience. Some things just don’t have to be that way. If you incorporate the idea of community engagement the design, the experience will becomes so much better. The product will have more meaning to it as it involves people not just the single lonely consumer.

UI // UX // Where To Next

by Tyler Savin

Tyler poses and interesting take on user experience and user expectations. He explores the concept that there is so much more then the typical user experience we think of. There is also the concept of engaging the person, of thinking a head of them to predict their moves. It is a proactive rather then reactive approach that you should honestly ponder yourself too.

On Being a Good Listener

by Raymond Duke

Being a good listener is a skill everyone should poses. The best way to start improving on this skill is to shut up, according to Raymond. He believes that if you just let the other person talk and don’t interrupt him, if you don’t take over the conversation with what you have to say or comment is the first step in becoming a great listener.

Are there any Medium posts you love that you’d want to share? Or maybe you’ve written some posts on Medium yourself? Share them in the comments; I’d love to check them out!

Paula Borowska

Paula runs a user experience blog BeingLimited and an author of an upcoming book about mobile design, the Mobile Design Book. You can connect with her on Google+.

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