The Monthly Fonts Roundup, January 2013

At Designmodo we want to give you the best tools to be creative.  Today, we’re quickly rounding up the most notable fonts that were released last month: 16 paid fonts, and as many free ones as we could find (quality ones are quite scarce, sadly). And they’re low to high priced, of course.

Many of the fonts I put here aren’t the most conventional. It’s quite easy to find a humanist sans-serif or grotesque all over the design land. We want to try showing you the interesting, unique fonts that you may have missed while staring at the front page of MyFonts.

SEE ALSO: Free Fonts for Web Design, Print and Products

Onward, then!

Capita (1 Free)

Capita

Capita is an old style serif that feels friendlier and much livelier than many old-style serifs with such low stroke contrast.

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Brisko Sans (1 Free)

Brisko Sans

Brisko is a humanist sans-serif with distinctive curves on its terminals and G-spurs that pushes it out of the crowd of similar sans-serifs. It looks great on display and text.

Flenja (1 Free)

Flenja

I’m cheating a little bit with Flenja, as it was released in late December. Regardless, it’s a classy typeface, tall and condensed with sharp, thin serifs.

Bispo (1 Free)

Bispo

Bispo is beautiful, like a script typeface without connecting glyphs. Strokes are totally calligraphic; with long swatches that turns words into a singular harmony.

Trend ($5/font)

Trend

Trend is the latest from Latino Type, an all-caps display Slab Serif more drastic than their previous types. Trend has a lot of similarities to Sanchez; what makes it interesting is its use of shadings to extend the depth of letters. It takes Trend over that extra step, giving it a raw boldness that’s different from Sanchez’s subtle elegance. Yet, the small stroke between the bottom serif and counter/arm of some of its letters (F, P, R) makes it feel quirky, and gives Trend some personality beyond the hard-hitting all-caps slab style.

Solida ($10/font)

Solida

Solida is a must. It’s a block typeface with multiple styles (outlined, textured, engraved, etc.), where only subtle, strategic cuts into the block create minimal readability. Solida evokes a sense of futurism, but it doesn’t feel tacky or constricted by a shallow understanding sci-fi fiction (think of all the “futuristic” fonts with the straight strokes). Rather, it brings out the feelings and ideas of futurism: the idea of simplicity, the elegance in geometric efficiency.

Amour ($10.50/font)

Amour

Amour is an incredibly tall and compact typeface with shaky stems and tiny serifs. Counters are long and oval shaped and crossbars near touch the bottom of letters. The inconsistencies in its strokes and its shapes give Amour charm.

Pailama ($19/font)

Pailama

Pailama is a typeface completely designed for display. Its letters are cute and quirky, and feel inspired by narratives of alien languages and ancient writings. Yet, Pailama uses its circles and dots that dance around strokes consistently, there’s clearly a design involved that takes it beyond mere unconventionality.

RM Opensans ($19/font)

RM Opensans

Opensans takes the rounded curves and circular counters of the geometric style and turns them into elegant outlines. At times it seems to go halfway into a Bauhaus, as its uppercase still retains some of the corners and curves you would see in a normal grotesque. I would say it’s a compromise, one that makes some of its feel a little bland, but its outlined style keeps it interesting. It does make it a little difficult to see what kind of feeling Opensans fits into, honestly, but I kind of like that. I encourage you to experiment.

Quarzo ($20/font)

Quarzo

Quarzo is slightly thicker than a lot of scripts, with calligraphic strokes where you can see the sudden change in direction, which is very neat. It gives a kind of strength to Quarzo, that isn’t found in script typefaces like Platinus or the Poem Script.

Steagal ($24.75/ $11.99 for whole pack)

Steagal

Steagal is a Futura-inspired geometric typeface, which doesn’t mean it’s a Futura replacement. It has some varied elements taken from other styles, as it does feature a two-storey ‘a’ and its curved ‘t’. What make Steagal great are its pointed apexes and its large spacing. Steagal’s apexes make it feel sharp and poignant, but its spacing and use of curves makes it a little friendlier.

Salamander Script ($24.50/font)

Salamander Script

Salamander is a playful and quirky script that doesn’t aim for elegance but charm. It also comes with added ornaments that are a little costly but worth it if you can pay for it.

Schwager ($25/font)

Schwager

Schwager takes the bold, hardline slab serif to full extremes. The type feels tough and uncompromising, with more dull corners from the change in stroke direction that makes its letters feel armoured. Nothing feels excessive, though, there’s a class to Schwager that allows it to fit into serious headlines and reasonably small text just fine.

Mandevilla ($29/font)

Mandevilla

Mandevilla is a beautiful display type with wild curves extending past their boundaries. Strokes are thick with dotted ends, and letters are decorative.

Axia ($50/font)

Axia

I’ve discussed Axia before, and for good reason. The typeface is a creative take on stencil, using cuts and playing with stroke to create a balance between sharpness and approachability.

Ciutadella ($50/font)

Ciutadella

And lastly, Ciutadella is a great sans-serif, with subtly narrow letters whose curves and counters that resemble ellipses.

Zolani Stewart

Zolani Stewart is a videogame critic and avid type enthusiast. You can read his endless musings over on Twitter at @Fengxii.

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